Connecticut Neon Underglow Laws

Connecticut neon underglow usage is governed by the state's Code. All relevant laws, rules and regulations pertaining to vehicle lighting including car underglow in Connecticut have been provided below. Make sure to examine the regulations carefully and do not use any restricted lights.

Usage of neon underglow lighting is governed by Connecticut Code, Title 14: Motor Vehicles, Chapter 246: Motor Vehicles, Sections 14-83 to 14-96.

Is neon underglow legal in Connecticut?

Connecticut laws restrict all additional aftermarket vehicle lighting which includes neon underglow. In Connecticut neon underglow is illegal.

The state of CT requires all non-mandatory vehicle lighting equipment to be certified, and according to ct.gov no manufacturers have certified the color or intensity of their products, essentially meaning all neon underglow is considered illegal.

In case you want to install street glow for off-road use on private property, we suggest avoiding all flashing or rotating lights, as well as colors green, blue and red as these are typically used on emergency vehicles.

Based on Connecticut’s rigorous laws driving a vehicle with non-legal aftermarket lighting installed, even if those lights are turned off and not in use, may be considered illegal.

Connecticut vehicle lighting laws

Below are relevant laws and regulations from Connecticut Code, Chapter 246: Motor Vehicles, Sections 14-83 to 14-96.

Sec. 14-96c. Tail lamps. Illumination of rear registration plate

[…] (c) The rear registration plate shall be so illumined with a white light […]

Sec. 14-96g. Colors of lamps and reflectors. Reflective sheeting on certain vehicles

(a) Front clearance lamps, identification lamps and those marker lamps and reflectors mounted on the front or on the side near the front of a vehicle shall display or reflect an amber color. […]

(c) All lighting devices and reflectors mounted on the rear of any vehicle shall display or reflect a red color, except that the stop light or other signal device may be red, amber or yellow, and except that the light illuminating the license plate shall be white and the light emitted by a back-up lamp shall be white or amber.

Sec. 14-96p. Color of lights. Flashing or revolving lights. Authorized use of blue or green lights.

(a)(1) No person shall display upon any motor vehicle any light visible from the front thereof other than white, yellow or amber, or any light other than red, yellow, amber or white visible from the rear thereof.

(3) A vehicle being operated by the chief executive officer of an emergency medical service organization […] may use a flashing red light or lights or flashing white head lamps and a flashing amber light.

(4) Flashing or revolving white lights may not be displayed upon a motor vehicle except (A) on fire emergency apparatus, (B) on motor vehicles of paid fire chiefs and their deputies and assistants, up to a total of five individuals per department, and may be displayed in combination with flashing or revolving red lights, (C) on motor vehicles of volunteer fire chiefs and their deputies and assistants, up to a total of five individuals per department, and may be displayed in combination with flashing or revolving red lights, (D) as a means of indicating a right or left turn, (E) in conjunction with flashing red lights on an ambulance responding to an emergency call, or (F) on the top rear of any school bus.

(b) A blue light may not be illuminated upon a motor vehicle, except that a vehicle being operated by an active member of a volunteer fire department or company or an active member of an organized civil preparedness auxiliary fire company who has been authorized in writing by the chief executive officer of such department or company may use such a light, including a flashing blue light.

(c) A flashing green light may not be used upon a motor vehicle, except that a vehicle being operated by an active member of a volunteer ambulance association or company who has been authorized in writing by the chief executive officer of such association or company may use such a light while on the way to the scene of an emergency requiring his or her services.

Sec. 14-96q. Special restrictions on lamps. Flashing lights.

(b) No person shall drive or move any vehicle or equipment upon any highway with any lamp or device thereon displaying a red light visible from directly in front of the center thereof. The provisions of this subsection and subsection (c) shall not apply to authorized emergency and maintenance vehicles.

(c) Flashing lights are prohibited on motor vehicles […]

Exceptions include emergency vehicles, police cars, etc. Unless authorized, use of flashing lights is considered an infraction.

Sec. 14-137-101. Allowable colors

Any light visible from a motor vehicle shall not be of a color except as follows: (a) Any light visible from the front of the vehicle shall be white, yellow or amber; (b) Any light visible from the forwardmost edge of the rear tire of the vehicle to the front of the vehicle shall be amber or yellow; (c) Any light visible from the forwardmost edge of the rear tire of the vehicle to the rear of the vehicle shall be red; and (d) Any light visible from the rear of the vehicle shall be red or amber

Sec. 14-137-102. Definition of colors

Allowable colors specified in Sec. 14-96a-3 shall comply with the color definitions in the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Standard J578 MAY 88 for the colors red, yellow (amber), selective yellow, white (achromatic) or white to yellow.

Sec. 14-137-103. Luminous intensity

The luminous intensity of a lighting device in accordance with Sec. 14-96a-2 which is not required or permitted lighting shall not exceed three hundred (300) candela unless an SAE or FMVSS standard exists for the device permitting a different intensity in a specified direction.

Sec. 14-137-104. Certification

Unless a lighting device is required or permitted by law as specified in Sec. 14- 96a-2, a lighting device used in connection with a motor vehicle shall be certified for use by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) in accordance with the provisions of Section 14-137 (b) of the General Statutes.

Our information about car neon underglow laws in Connecticut was last updated in 2018 and checked in 2019. In case any info we provided is not up to date or correct be sure to contact us so we can revise it. Thank you!

Check our data with your local law enforcement or other relevant agencies! Connecticut underglow laws in certain cities or counties may be different from state legislation. While we do our very best to provide the most accurate information about LED and neon street glow usage we will not be held liable for any potentially incorrect or misinterpreted info.

State of Connecticut Info

Connecticut is the southernmost U.S. state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, and New York to the west and the south (with which it shares a water boundary in Long Island Sound). Connecticut is named after the Connecticut River, a major U.S. river that approximately bisects the state. It is the 3rd least extensive, the 29th most populous and 4th most densely populated of the 50 United States.

Capital: Hartford

Population: 3,590,347

Area: 5,543 sq mi (14,357 km2)

Cities ▼

Cities in Connecticut: Hartford, New Haven, Stamford, Bridgeport, Norwalk, Greenwich, Waterbury, Danbury, West Hartford, Westport, Newtown, Meriden, Groton, New Britain, Hamden, Middletown, Fairfield, New Canaan, New London, Milford, Branford, Darien, Glastonbury, Wallingford, Ridgefield, Wethersfield, Bristol, Trumbull, Southington, Farmington, Torrington, East Hartford, Enfield, West Haven, Manchester, Simsbury, New Milford, Shelton, Storrs, Cheshire, Newington, Norwich, Old Saybrook, Naugatuck, Guilford, Southbury, North Haven, South Windsor, Lyme, Ansonia

Counties ▼

Counties in Connecticut: Fairfield, Hartford, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London, Tolland, Windham

Wikipedia

State website



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